History – A. Crawford MHS

Picture of A. Crawford Mosley
A Crawford Mosley

The Bay County School Board, meeting in regular sessions on June 14, 1972, named the new high school to be constructed in Bay County the A. Crawford Mosley High School in grateful appreciation for Mr. Mosley’s years of devoted service to the young people of Bay County. A. Crawford Mosley had been a resident of Panama City since 1915. He served as assistant principal, athletic coach and teacher at Panama Grammar School. In addition to these duties, Mr. Mosley also served as a member of the Bay County School Board for twenty continuous years beginning in 1955. He had been an outstanding civic, religious and school leader in Bay County, and for these reasons this school was given his name. The Bay County School Board appointed Marvin McCain to serve as the first principal of A. C. Mosley High School and Bob Jordan and Curtis Pittman as the assistant principals. Mr. McCain served as the first principal from the beginning day of classes until his retirement in 1983.

Picture of Marvin McCain
Marvin McCain

In March 1974, Mosley students moved into their new high school almost six months past the originally scheduled occupancy date. These students had been attending double sessions at Bay High School since the 1973-74 school year began in the fall. At the time of its opening, Mosley was dubbed as one of the educational showplaces of North Florida. The school was constructed to handle a total capacity of 2,000 students. It is situated on a 60 acre tract of land and the original building consisted of 242 fully air conditioned rooms with closed circuit TV and intercommunication system. The outside physical education facilities included tennis courts, handball courts, track, baseball and softball fields, multipurpose fields and a junior Olympic sized swimming pool. The building was designed by Chester A. Parker and was constructed by the firm of Burns, Kirkley and Williams of Auburn, Alabama, at a cost of 3.6 million dollars.

Picture of Hugh Tucker
Hugh Tucker

Mr. Hugh Tucker became the second principal of A. Crawford Mosley High School in 1983 after having taught in our community for twenty-eight years. When asked his plans for Mosley’s future progress, he replied, “Movement back to quality education is visible nationwide. The most comprehensive reform is taking place here in Florida. As chief administrator of Mosley High School, my goal is to have this high school among the leaders in the state. There has been a strong mandate for change and quality has become the password in American education. We are entering a new era of harder work expectations from students. The tougher standards demand better instruction. Erecting higher barriers is easy; it is more difficult, and more important, to make sure that all students have the capacity to get over them.”

Picture of Larry Bollinger
Larry Bolinger

Mr. Larry Bolinger was selected by a committee of students, faculty, administrators and parents to lead Mosley into the 21st century beginning with the 1994-95 school year. Mr. Bolinger was best noted for his willingness to take risks and for his open-mindedness when it came to innovative programs in education. Mr. Bolinger’s tenure at Mosley High School was cut short when he was elected to become the School Superintendent for Bay District Schools in November of 1996.

Picture of Bill Husfelt
Bill Husfelt

Mr. Bill Husfelt took over the helm from Larry Bolinger in December of 1996. Mr. Husfelt was the former assistant principal at Bay High School, however he was quickly accepted as a true Mosley Dolphin. Mr. Husfelt was eager to get to work improving the school plant by repainting the halls and cleaning up the general appearance of the school. He stressed his open door policy to students and parents alike. This open door policy contributed greatly to Mr. Husfelt’s success and enabled him to be known among many future graduating classes as the “students’ principal.” To this day, school spirit and academic pride are very important to him. Under Mr. Husfelt’s leadership, Mosley High School became the first “A” high school in Bay District Schools and earned “A” school status four out of  six years.

Picture of Sandy Harrison
Sandy Harrison

Our fifth principal, Mrs. Sandy Harrison, a 1976 graduate of Mosley High School, is our first female principal. She came “back” to Mosley in 2008, being appointed by Mr. Bill Husfelt, who was elected Bay District School Superintendent. She has served students from Kindergarten through High School, but loves teenagers the best. “They keep me on my toes and young. I am always amazed at their creativity and energy.” Under her leadership, A. Crawford Mosley High School continues to enjoy top rankings in academics as well as athletics and student involvement and success. In the last ten year’s,  Mosley has earned 5 “A’s” and 5 “B’s” under the state of Florida’s A+ Plan school grading system.   Mosley continues to be a leader in many innovative and prestigious educational programs, providing a comprehensive and challenging education to a student body of approximately 1740.  A. Crawford Mosley High School was ranked number 54  out of 777 Florida public schools. As an alumnus whose two boys also graduated from Mosley, former Assistant Principal at Mosley and now, Principal, she truly believes in our school motto that “Being A Dolphin Is A Lifestyle!”

Picture of Mosley Crest
Mosley Crest

The school colors, green, orange and white, and the school mascot, the Dolphin, were selected by the first students who attended Mosley High School. The Bay County School Board appointed Marvin McCain to serve as the first principal and Bob Jordan and Curtis Pittman as the assistant principals. Miss Jan Shirley was selected as the first homecoming queen to represent Mosley High School and Mr. Mark Rosser was the first Student Government Association president.  Mosley truly has a rich tradition of academics, athletics and student life.

Being a Dolphin is a lifestyle!

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